Book Review: Copic Coloring Guide

I am doing a series of book reviews on my blog on some of my recent craft book purchases. Today, I’m reviewing the Copic Coloring Guide by Marianne Walker & Colleen Schaan. The book just came out in June 2011 and I just finished reading it – cover to cover – yes, I’m obsessed like that.

Well, let’s just say, I’m glad it came out but I’m mildly disappointed with it. Specifically, I’m glad because there are 16 pages in the book dedicated to coloring techniques (ie. inking and blending techniques, how to use your colors and colorless blender to create specific looks). This was expanded in the project area where I am surprised how frequently the transfer blending was used as opposed to coloring it directly on the paper (on paper blending). No wonder my work is just not looking as refined as these “artists”, even if I have been through the certification program.

I’m disappointed because out of a 63 page book (yes, this one is magazine-sized), there was only 18 pages dedicated to teaching you to color!! (Really, 11 pages – after you take away 7 pages of product introduction.) The rest of the book was all the other different cards from contributing artists – just like every other idea book out there. If I hadn’t read it cover-to-cover and line-to-line, I wouldn’t have discovered how these artists use their markers to create their cards. 63 pages just to make 1 discovery. Couldn’t each artists describe at greater length their coloring techniques?? (instead of step by step instruction of HOW they made the cards)

It’s a nice to have book; not a must-have.

And here is something positive to end the review – I found some nice color family that I could add to my personal Copic color book.

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My Copic Color Swatch Book

One of the things I learnt from my Copic Certification Program is to write down any colors you use (especially the ones that you like) because you will not remember when it comes to recreating it for the next card. My Copic instructor, Debbie Olson, even brought her Copic Color Book for a show-and-tell and it is a truly astounding resource.

So, based on Debbie’s advice, I created my own Copic Color book. Mine’s obviously not as filled out as hers but I plan to fill it out as I discover colors I like.

I created 13 sections – 10 sections for each Copic color family; and the last 3 sections are for hair, skin and fur colors (imagine blond, brunette, black, red hair variations; Caucasian, Asian, African-American, Native American skin tone and all the different bear/dog fur colors – you will have enough favorites for them to have their own section.)

FYI – there are companies out there who have already coordinated nicely blended colors in each colors family – Papertrey Ink, Just Rite Stamps, Flourishes, to name a few on my radar screen. Try out those colors as a starting point for your book.

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